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Author Topic: Looking to become a security systems installer as a career. A couple questions.  (Read 2260 times)

djm227

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Hello all, first post.

I'm looking for a career change, and the security/alarm installation field has always fascinated me.  My primary question is, what exactly do I need to know in order to get involved in this career?  Do alarm companies provide new recruits with comprehensive training, or do you need to know your stuff before even applying?  ADT has a few openings in my area, and I was thinking of applying soon.

I've worked maintenance jobs for more than five years, and have a solid knowledge of electricity and circuits.  I'm no expert, but I've read a couple of text books.  I also have a BA degree in the IT field.  I know that's unrelated, but I figure it wouldn't hurt.  I'm in my mid twenties.

Any advice would be much appreciated.  Merry Christmas!
« Last Edit: December 26, 2014, 10:23:48 PM by djm227 »

corxxgold

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Most train new people

AlarmMike

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Starting out from scratch with any of the large companies will be as a "grunt" wire-puller with a lot of time spent in attics and crawlspaces.

As quickly as you can, study and work towards your low-volt journeyman's license.  This will be a good pay raise and open doors for you.

After this, many techs will then continue on and get their admin license and move on to start their own businesses.

But we all started out with those attics and crawl spaces.  If you can put in the time and build your hours, study for the exams, it's a great and "secure" field to be in.  Aside from security, you'd be looking at network, telcom, video, sound, HVAC, you name it.

Having IT in your background is great, as much of the industry has been shifting over to digital and IP over the last few years and is the future.
1993-1995   Worked for one of the "nationals"  /  1996-Present   Independent dealer
Systems supported:   DSC, Ademco/Honeywell, ITI/GE/Interlogix
-----------------------------
To the world you may be one person, but to one person you are the world.
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djm227

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Thank you, lots of good info.

After some research, it looks as though Ohio does not require or provide low-volt licensing.  Are there any other general qualifications or certifications that I could work on to counter this? 

Source: http://www.neca-neis.org/state/state-low-voltage-licensing

Steve French

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Thank you, lots of good info.

After some research, it looks as though Ohio does not require or provide low-volt licensing.  Are there any other general qualifications or certifications that I could work on to counter this? 

Source: http://www.neca-neis.org/state/state-low-voltage-licensing

This is something that kind of interests me as well. I will be retiring in a few years on my company pension and was thinking about different things to do. I will be way too young to go on Social Security and would like to take on part time work to supplement my wife's income. My background is commercial and industrial electrical maintenance with a good smattering of access control wiring and commercial appliance repair added in. It will be interesting to see what you come up with.

I

 

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