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1

No, don't put a mag switch on the hinge side of a door.
...the plunger switch may be your only option.
Same thing with your sliders...you're stuck with the plunger.

Looks like the installer "took the plunge(r)" for the following reasons:
- On the two sliders, he did not run enough wire to mount recessed mag switches up high where both the frame and closing section are all wood. I suspect he didn't know the exact model of sliders that were to be installed, so decided to place the plunger inconspicuously low rather than near eye level and that determined the cable run.
- On the hinge side door, he again didn't run enough cable to be able to use a recessed mag switch mounted on the non-hinged side. I suspect the original design called for another slider in that location, which determined his cabling, but was changed later to a swinging door and set of windows for aesthetic and/or cost reasons.
- On the big steel front door, it's actually double steel doors (and frame) with glass lights. One door is secured top and bottom with internal throwbolts. In order to use a recessed mag switch in this location, he either had to deal with recessing the magnet (assuming one switch) in the top of the swinging door or simply use a plunger down low on the hinge side. Simple choice.

So, it appears that the installer did the best he could with the various doors as designed and as built.

Thanks so much for your expertise, CO. It is fascinating to me to dig into this stuff and discover how and why technical decisions were made.

I believe I'll simply lay in a stock of plungers so the next owner of the house can replace them as they fail. With plunger MTBFs of approx. 6-8 years (in my LIMITED experience), and average home ownership of around 12 years, each homeowner should only have to replace the plungers once. I'll note it in the maintenance book for the house.

Thanks again for all your help. Nothing like talking to the pros.
 
2
...I see that the glass sliders have a metal strip that covers the latching mechanism in the moving slider, necessitating a plunger switch since there's no way to mount the magnet or rare earth magnetic disc...

Never say never.  Silicone is your friend when unable to drill.
3
Whoa there, hoss!

The failed window switch was a GRI 5065 magnetic switch of the type you are recommending.

The plunger switches (GRI DS-01T) are for several doors, including two sliders. The non-plunger doors (the majority) have no sensing problems and already use magnetic switches (probably also GRI 5065s). I'm not an alarm guy (obviously!) and didn't know the plungers were so flaky. But I figured that out pretty quick (3 out of 4 dead or dying in just 10 years). Only thing was, I didn't know if it was the nature of the gizmo or flawed manufacturing by GRI. Thanks for straightening that out.

Looking at my "plunger" doors with an eye to retrofitting with magnetics as you suggested, I see that the glass sliders have a metal strip that covers the latching mechanism in the moving slider, necessitating a plunger switch since there's no way to mount the magnet or rare earth magnetic disc. Another odd door is all steel and would be a bear to hack into (I'm surprised they were able to drill a hole in the steel frame for the plunger). But, behind Door #4 is a great opportunity to swap in a nice magnetic switch in the hinge side hole left by the plunger and I can easily pop the magnet into the wooden door itself. I'll make sure I do that as well as lay in a supply of replacement plungers for the next hapless owner of the joint.

Thanks, CO. Now, giddyup!

Oops! No, don't put a mag switch on the hinge side of a door.  I once had to fight with a rookie installer who was doing that and had to go to our boss to get him to stop.

The problem with a switch/mag pair on the hinge side is that the door can swing halfway open before the  magnet separates enough from the switch to open the contacts.  You can tap the magnet far enough into the door to solve that, but then when the door and frame swell (or shrink, depending on weather), or shift, as they ALL do eventually, then the magnet will be too far from the switch to hold it in the closed position. Those hinge-side mag/switches all generated return calls until they were replaced with plungers or re-wired.  The mag/switch closure margin on the hinge side is just too fine an adjustment to be reliable.

If you can't run the loop wire to the latch side of the door, then the plunger switch may be your only option.

Same thing with your sliders: It's not unusual not to be able to mount magnets on the closing edge of a slider, but if you can extend the wire loop to the top of the door, you can probably put a mag/switch pair there. The preferred configuration on tops of sliders is surface-mount, the magnet on the door directly under the switch and parallel to it.  If you can't get a wire there, then you're stuck with the plunger.
4
Thanks for the response. Looks like I can go magnetic on one of the four "plunger" doors as I described on the other thread. I'll do so.
5
Whoa there, hoss!

The failed window switch was a GRI 5065 magnetic switch of the type you are recommending.

The plunger switches (GRI DS-01T) are for several doors, including two sliders. The non-plunger doors (the majority) have no sensing problems and already use magnetic switches (probably also GRI 5065s). I'm not an alarm guy (obviously!) and didn't know the plungers were so flaky. But I figured that out pretty quick (3 out of 4 dead or dying in just 10 years). Only thing was, I didn't know if it was the nature of the gizmo or flawed manufacturing by GRI. Thanks for straightening that out.

Looking at my "plunger" doors with an eye to retrofitting with magnetics as you suggested, I see that the glass sliders have a metal strip that covers the latching mechanism in the moving slider, necessitating a plunger switch since there's no way to mount the magnet or rare earth magnetic disc. Another odd door is all steel and would be a bear to hack into (I'm surprised they were able to drill a hole in the steel frame for the plunger). But, behind Door #4 is a great opportunity to swap in a nice magnetic switch in the hinge side hole left by the plunger and I can easily pop the magnet into the wooden door itself. I'll make sure I do that as well as lay in a supply of replacement plungers for the next hapless owner of the joint.

Thanks, CO. Now, giddyup! 
6
Here's my take: Regardless of brand, ball-plunger switches are the least reliable switches you can use on a door or window. They are, in my not-so-humble opinion, the Last Resort contact to use when you just CAN'T no how, no way, fit a mag switch/magnet pair onto an opening.

Eventual failure of plunger-type contacts is virtually guaranteed because even if you don't paint them, eventually enough environmental "crud", down to talcum-fine dust, will accumulate in the plunger to cause it to stick closed or partially closed. Most techs agree and try to avoid using them, because we KNOW we're going to be seeing them later on.  Years maybe, or months or weeks if you paint them, but they WILL need to be replaced.

I strongly advise you to replace all your plunger switches with switch-magnet pair type switches, even though it may mean some extra trouble. If the original installer used them on SGDs (Sliding Glass Doors), it might be tricky to install a new magnet on the sash, Look into using a Long-Reach switch with a "donut" rare-earth magnet.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Rare-Earth-Magnet-Security-Alarm-Replacement-Countersunk-Hole-Contact-Minimax-/160953762531?epid=1232857308&hash=item25799782e3:m:msuDYwpMc2YGIVoqrtw5ZZw
7
I"m quoting the OP from your other thread:
http://www.shieldlab.com/forum/index.php/topic,37560.0.html

Gents,

I've got 3 out of 4 failures with the George Risk Industries (GRI) ball plunger switches (DS-01T) and the one 5065 magnetic window contact I mentioned earlier. Seems like a lot of failure on the sliding glass doors (plungers). Is GRI a decent brand and any specific weaknesses with plunger switches, GRI or just in general? Thanks for any info.

Williakz, this is information that is relevant to THIS thread. If you had told us that you were working with ball-plungers switches, I'm sure AlarmMike's and bramfrank's responses would have been different. What they did saw was good advice but it was generic, not aimed at ball-plunger switches in particular.

Here's my take: Regardless of brand, ball-plunger switches are the least reliable switches you can use on a door or window. They are, in my not-so-humble opinion, the Last Resort contact to use when you just CAN'T no how, no way, fit a mag switch/magnet pair onto an opening.

Eventual failure of plunger-type contacts is virtually guaranteed because even if you don't paint them, eventually enough environmental "crud", down to talcum-fine dust, will accumulate in the plunger to cause it to stick closed or partially closed. Most techs agree and try to avoid using them, because we KNOW we're going to be seeing them later on.  Years maybe, or months or weeks if you paint them, but they WILL need to be replaced.

I strongly advise you to replace all your plunger switches with switch-magnet pair type switches, even though it may mean some extra trouble. If the original installer used them on SGDs (Sliding Glass Doors), it might be tricky to install a new magnet on the sash, Look into using a Long-Reach switch with a "donut" rare-earth magnet.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-Rare-Earth-Magnet-Security-Alarm-Replacement-Countersunk-Hole-Contact-Minimax-/160953762531?epid=1232857308&hash=item25799782e3:m:msuDYwpMc2YGIVoqrtw5ZZw
8
Gents,

I've got 3 out of 4 failures with the George Risk Industries (GRI) ball plunger switches (DS-01T) and the one 5065 magnetic window contact I mentioned earlier. Seems like a lot of failure on the sliding glass doors (plungers). Is GRI a decent brand and any specific weaknesses with plunger switches, GRI or just in general? Thanks for any info.
9
I would like to add two more wireless sensors,  I would appreciate if someone could explain how this could be done.

The zones would be 17 & 18

Thanks in advance
10
Did some good ole fashion research. What I found is if the IP Camera or other POE devices says : "12v - POE" it actually means that it uses 12v from the local power supply or 48v POE. This is the short explanation. There are pages explaining the works of POE. I knew this but just wasn't thinking. So looks as though the 48v 15.5w POE injector will work fine. 
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